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Email Etiquette

Email Etiquette

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Below are just some key email etiquette topics that need to be considered when it comes to every email sent. These are the concerns business owners, their employees and yes even we need to be aware of in our day-to-day online communications to ensure the best possible results.

SUBJECT:

Field: Avoid sending emails with No subject or non-descriptive.

The SUBJECT: field is the window into an email and can many times determine if or when an email is ever to be opened. Whether or not this is an initial contact with students or fellow employees, be sure to have a short SUBJECT: that indicates clearly what the topic of the email is. Adding the action needed, related topics, reasons for and/or deadlines will assist the receiver from ignoring the message or gives a chance to prioritize. Typos, all caps or all small case can lend to an unprofessional impression or the appearance of being a spammer

Addressing:

How a person is addressed should be with the highest level of courtesy. This can set the tone of the message relayed and how it is received, all from a simple but important greeting.

Examples:

Hello, Mr. Anderson,
Dear Ms. Jones,
Dr. Osborne,
Good Day All.

Within communication with individuals notice clues on when it may be best to address individuals with a more relaxed tone by a persons approach with replies as well as how they sign off. Most of our GCSC family do not mind being called by their first name, however, within such a changing environment that can be perceived as taking premature liberties in the relationship if used too soon.

Signature files:

Keep your signature files to no more than 5-6 lines to avoid being viewed as egocentric. Limit your signature to your name, company name, and slogan/offer or phone number.

A useful tip: Include a link to your Website where the recipient can get all your contact information from A-Z – that is what your site is for. Do not forget to include the “http://” when including your Website address within emails and your signature file to ensure the URL is recognized as a clickable URL regardless of the user’s software or platform

Reply to All:

As mentioned earlier this week, “Reply All responses should not be used with the GCSC or GCSC-NonAdjunct college email groups and only used sparingly with the other email groups. Please reply or forward your email response to specific individuals.” 

Use this button with discretion, carefully think about whether “all” really need to be aware of a reply.

Formatting:

Refrain from using any formatting in your day-to-day email communications. Unless you would type something in bold crimson letters on business letterhead, don’t do it when emailing. With all the spam filtering going on today; the more formatting or embedded images the higher the chance that a sent email could be ignored or blocked if sending to outside contacts.

Attachments: 

Do not send to GCSC or GCSC-NonAdjunct
If you need to send a file or combination of files attached over a specific size (50 MB) on campus or (20 MB) off campus business courtesy dictates to ask the recipient(s) first if it is okay to send a large file. Next, confirm they have the same software and version you do and what is the best time of day to send it to them to ensure they are available to download the large file and keep their email flowing. Never send large attachments without warning, on weekends or after business hours when the recipient may not be there to keep their inbox clear.

Respond Promptly:

By all means necessary do the best to respond to email communications as quickly as possible. This is a customer service matter that should not be underestimated. By not responding promptly it can make us seem unorganized, uncaring or worse yet, risk being viewed by students, community or vendors as less efficient and not on the ball.

This is it for now! These very important topics will certainly allow our college communications to rise above the mainstream. These were just a few points but when it comes to any written form of communication used, professionalism and courtesy never go unnoticed.

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