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Critiquing Guide for Problem-Based Learning Curriculum Unit

Critiquing Guide for Problem-based learning curriculum Unit

Submitting Teacher: ___________________________

Title of PBL Unit: ______________________________

Date Reviewed: _______________________________

Reviewer: ____________________________________

Categories to Examine Commendable Acceptable Acceptable with Changes
Student Roles Student roles are clearly defined, an integral part of the problem, and authentic to the problem Student roles are an integral part of the problem, but authenticity is questionable Student role is absent, unclear, or relevance of role to the problem is not established
Two or more student roles are present One student roles is present  
Nature of the Problem Problem is ill-structured in that it activates students’ prior knowledge but requires research to solve (No known solution or solution path.)  Problem is solvable to within the time allotted. Problem may be slightly too complex or too narrow, but solvable within the time allotted.  (No known solution or solution path.) Problem is so narrow, students are led to one solution path OR problem is so broad, students cannot determine problem focus OR there is no need to solve the problem, as a solution exists in the public domain
Problem is of high impact (impacts large population and/or is of high importance to the locale) and is motivating to students. Problem is of high interest to students, though not a high impact problem. Problem is one of low impact, low interest.
Problem is interdisciplinary in 3 or more areas. Problem is interdisciplinary in 2 areas. Problem is not interdisciplinary as written
Problem contains 2 of 3 motivating factors:  novelty, discrepant event, or high relevance to the real world.   Problem is not interdisciplinary as written.
Meet the Problem Method Authentic format is used for presenting the problem to students. Format is realistic, but not outstandingly authentic to the problem. Format is unrealistic, contrived, not authentic to the problem.
Problem as an Instructional Strategy Problem promotes acquisition of skills/knowledge found in national standards as well as state, district, and school standards. Problem promotes acquisition of state, district, and school standards. Problem is not aligned to national or local standards.
Problem includes materials not normally studied in this class if such materials help students build important life skills. Problem primarily emphasizes school-based skills, with some attention to life skills. Problem exclusively emphasizes school-based skills.
Problem activities are suitable for a variety of student learning styles. Problem activities are diverse, but tend to be suitable for a limited number of learning styles. Problem activities are suitable to only 1-2 learning styles.
Problem contains a range of activities so students of different achievement levels can contribute. Problem activities are diverse, but tend to be suitable for a limited number of learning styles. No diverse levels of achievement are present within problem activities.
Resources The resource list contains a mix of print resources (books, journals); Internet; and non-print resources (videos, films, speakers) available in classroom, school, and larger community. Four or more different types of resources are present.   The resource list contains resources from 2 or more categories (print, Internet, and non-print) available from classroom, school, or larger community. The resources list contains resources form only one category and/or concentrates only on classroom and school resources.
Resources on the list are developmentally appropriate for target student population. Some resource levels may be slightly above or slightly below the developmental age of the target student population. Most resources are developmentally inappropriate for the target student population.
Abundant resources are available for students to successfully solve the problem. Sufficient resources are available to allow students to successfully solve the problem. Resources are insufficient to allow students to successfully solve the problem.
Student
Engagement and Motivation
Requires active participation by every student in the class. Requires contributions by every student in the class. Some students have no active role in solving the problem.
Student autonomy is encouraged, as students may choose from several different capstone performance formats (oral presentation, written report, drama, etc.) Student autonomy is encouraged, as students may choose from several differing strategies within the same capstone performance (live skit, recorded skit, speech, reenactment) Capstone performance is assigned by the teacher with no range of choices in strategies or format.
Capstone Performance Requires students to demonstrate mastery of curriculum content and skills.   It is unclear how students will demonstrate mastery of content/skills.
Is authentic to the problem.   Does not provide exemplar of real-world work.
Promotes learning of most of the stated learning objectives or standards.   Provides little opportunity for  promotion of learning objectives or standards.
Audience includes class members, teacher, and a member from outside the classroom. Audience includes class members and teacher. Teacher is the only audience member.
Rubric for Assessing the Capstone Performance The rubric contains at least 6 criteria, with 3 or more clearly written descriptors for each. The rubric utilizes at least 4 criteria, with 2 or more clearly written descriptors for each. The rubric utilizes less than 4 criteria and/or descriptors are unclear.
Criteria identify all components of exemplary work. Criteria identify the majority of components of exemplary work. Criteria do not adequately identify components of exemplary work.
Criteria reflect alignment to all stated learning objectives. Criteria reflect alignment to most of the stated learning objectives. Criteria reflect alignment to only a few of the stated learning objectives.
Point scores on the rubric are adjusted to show relative importance of the criteria.   Point scores on rubric are misaligned with importance of criteria.
Score conversion scale is provided.   No score conversion scale is present.
Rubric provides substantial feedback for performance improvement, utilizing analytical scoring. Rubric provides adequate feedback for performance improvement, utilizing analytical scoring. Inadequate feedback for performance improvement is available or holistic scoring is used.
Rubric uses clear language, easily understood by target student population.   Language in rubric is ambiguous, unclear, or developmentally inappropriate.
Rubric addresses self, peer, group, and teacher assessment. Rubric only addressed 3 types (of self, peer, group, and teacher) of assessment. Rubric only addresses 1-3 types of assessment.
Supporting Documentation A minimum of 3 sample coaching questions for each category of the unit is present.  The level of each question is designated. A minimum of 3 sample coaching questions for each category of the unit is present. Less than 3 sample coaching questions for each category of the unit is present.
Sample problem statement provides student roles, outlines problem, and gives a minimum of 4 conditions for solving. Sample problem statement provides student roles, outlines problem, and gives a minimum of 3 conditions for solving. Sample problem statement does not use PBL format, with student roles or problem outline or 3 conditions missing.
Know board contains a minimum of 7 facts derived from the Meet the Problem document(-s). Know board contains a minimum of 5 facts derived from the Meet the Problem document(-s). Know board contains less than 5 facts or facts do not appear to be derived from the Meet the Problem document(-s).
Need to know board contains a minimum of 10 questions. Need to know board contains a minimum of 7 questions. Less than 7 questions are on the need to know board.
Two alternative solutions are clearly and completely explained, each with 4 pros, 4 cons, and 2 consequences. Two alternative solutions are present, each with 4 pros, 4 cons, and 2 consequences. Only one possible solution to the problem is articulated or less than 4 pros, 4 cons, and 2 consequences are present.
Description of debriefing session includes clear procedures for review of student-generated solutions, the rating of those solutions by students, the choice of one best, overall class solution, and coaching by the teacher during this session. Description of debriefing session includes clear procedures for review of student-generated solutions, the rating of these solutions by students, and the choice of one best, overall class solution. Description of debriefing session does not clearly outline procedures to be used for review of student-generated solutions, the rating of these solutions by students, and the choice of one best, overall class solution or one or more procedures is missing.
Web Profile sheet is complete.   Web Profile sheet is incomplete.

 

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