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Date Rape

Date Rape

Statistics

Date rape is the act of forcing sex on a date or acquaintance through coercion, manipulation, intimidation and/or physical restraint. 85% of women who are raped know their attacker.

  • Men are also victims of sexual assault, but women are more often the targets

  • Rape is not caused by sexual passion, arousal, lust or love. It is most often committed by someone the woman thought she knew well enough to consider a “nice guy.”

  • Rape is not caused by the victim’s appearance, her clothing, personality or level of attractiveness

  • Rape – by a stranger, acquaintance or “friend” is a crime; marital rape is a crime. Rape is a devastating experience.

  • Impact of date rape can be emotional and/or physical and may include:

    Emotional – anxiety and depression, feelings of guilt or shame, avoiding social interactions, difficulty focusing, feelings of hopelessness or problems with sexual intimacy

    Physical – unwanted pregnancy, STD, possible injury

  • You have the right to be treated with respect at all times

  • You have the right to refuse sex AT ANY TIME even if you have previously consented

  • NO MEANS NO. No exceptions!

if you've experienced sexual assault

If you have experienced date rape (or sexual assault of any kind), there are immediate steps you can take:

  • Call the 24-hour crisis line at (866) 218-4738

  • Gulf Coast Sexual Assault Program at (850) 832-9869 or (850) 832-9708

  • http://www.gulfcoastcac.org/our-programs-gulf-coast-sexual-assault-program.aspx
  • Trevor Project (866) 488-7386 – national network for lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) individuals. Crisis stabilization and support. Also see www.pflag.org (Parents and Families of lesbians and gays.)

  • Call friends or family who can give you emotional support

  • Seek medical attention at Bay Medical or Gulf Coast Hospital

  • Make a report immediately in case you decide to pursue charges

  • For referral or short-term confidential counseling, contact the GCSC Counseling Office:  Cindy Boshelle at (850) 769-1551, ext. 2829 or Leigh Bailey (850) 769-1551, ext. 4628

What can you do to reduce risks of sexual assault?

If you are a woman:

  • Be up front about your sexual expectations and limitations. Be clear what your limits are. Don’t be shy.

  • Do not be ambiguous, shy or afraid to say “no” early and without hesitating

  • Pay attention – notice if your wishes are being ignored, even in small ways

  • It is okay to leave if you begin to feel uncomfortable

  • Monitor your consumption of alcohol; you are less likely to take risks or experience impaired senses if you are not impaired by alcohol

If you are a man:

  • Sharpen your awareness! If a woman says “no” or seems uncomfortable or reluctant to go further sexually, back off. Interpret this as a no and stop immediately.

  • You do not have the right to expect or pressure a woman for sex

  • Paying for dinner, being with a woman who is flirtatious or dressed provocatively does not give you the right

  • If she agrees at first but later changes her mind (even if you have had sex with her before) you do not have the right

  • Monitor your consumption of alcohol. Intoxication can lead to poor judgment and aggressive behavior. Intoxication is not a defense for sexual assault.

If you are gay or lesbian:

  • Do not think you are exempt from date rape, sexual violence or assault

  • LGBT individuals may be at greater risk of sexual assault due to homophobia

  • The same precautions apply to same-sex friends, partners or acquaintances as to the heterosexual community

  • Many members of the LGBT community may feel even more hesitation to call for help. Silence is not a solution, however. Please follow the plan outlined above.

  • Call any or all the phone numbers listed above for emergency help, assistance and support.

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